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In-Depth Market Research and Trend Analysis

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Categories

Topics

Healthcare and Biomedical Engineering

3D Bioprinting

Microfluidic devices for neurology

Tissue engineering scaffolds

Tissue repair and engineering procedures for cancer treatment

Medical electronics

Advanced Materials

Thermoelectric materials

Flat glass for radiation shielding

Nanotechnology

Nanotextiles

Graphene for healthcare

Mechanical, Chemical and Environmental Technologies

Superalloys and shape memory alloys for medical applications

 

Nanotechnology


The market for graphene used in medical applications is projected to grow at a CAGR of 39.1% through 2026.

 

Graphene was first isolated from graphite in 2004 by Prof. Andre Geim and Prof. Kostya Novoselov at the University of Manchester in the U.K. Since then, this one-atom-thick carbon allotrope with a hexagonal honeycomb structure has been rapidly gaining attention worldwide for its unique structure and properties.

 

Various methods are available for producing graphene. They are summarized in the table below, based on popularity. Popularity has been calculated based on the share of global patents and patent applications published during the past 20 years for that particular production method.

 

 

Most of the existing fabrication methods are unable to produce graphene in large quantities without compromising its intrinsic characteristics, thus contributing to the high unit price of this material.  In recent years, roll-to-roll and plasma-enhanced CVD processes, and liquid-phase exfoliation have been developed to manufacture graphene on a mass scale.

 

Graphene is presently sold primarily as mono-, bi-, and few-layer coatings (e.g., on copper foil, silica substrate, or polymer film); nanostructures (e.g., nanoplatelets, quantum dots, and nanoribbons); and graphene oxide powder.

 

At the present time, graphene is chiefly used for applications within the electronics (including optoelectronics), composites, and energy sectors, for fabrication of devices such as supercapacitors, batteries, organic photovoltaic cells, high-strength composites, touch screens, liquid crystal displays, and organic light-emitting diodes. A number of applications are also emerging within the medical field.

 

As shown in the next figure, graphene exhibits various relevant properties, such as high conductivity (electrons move faster than in other materials), flexibility and elasticity, biocompatibility, and antimicrobial properties. All these properties make graphene (and its oxide) suitable for different types of applications within the healthcare sector. They can be grouped according to five main categories: sensors, implants and scaffolds, imaging and testing, therapies, and others.

 


 

The global graphene market is estimated to be valued at $31.3 million in 2016 and forecast to grow at a 45.7% CAGR during the next 10 years, exceeding global revenues of  $1.3 billion by 2026. Graphene for medical applications is estimated to account for just 2.2% of the global market in 2016. Growing at a CAGR of 39.1%, graphene for the healthcare sector is projected to generate global revenues of $18.7 million in 2026. Sensors and therapies will account for nearly 70% of the market.

 

 


The next table provides a list of key producers of graphene, with special focus on medical applications.

 

 

Key producers of graphene.

 

Company

Location

Product Type

2-DTech Graphene

Cheltenham, U.K.

Graphene in various forms

Abalonyx

Oslo, Norway

Graphene oxide

ACS Material

Medford, MA

Graphene in various forms

Advanced Graphene Products

Nowy Kisielin, Poland

High-strength metallurgical graphene

Angstron Materials

Dayton, OH

Graphene nanoplatelets and dispersions

Applied Graphene Materials

Cleveland, U.K.

Graphene nanoplatelets and dispersions

Avanzare

Navarrete, Spain

Graphene nanoplatelets

CealTech

Stavanger, Norway

Single-layer pure graphene

DFJ Nanotechnologies

Shijiazhuang, China

Graphene in various forms

First Graphite

Nedlands, West Australia

Graphene nanoplatelets

Grafen

Ankara, Turkey

Graphene in various forms

Grafoid

Kingstone, Canada

Few-layer graphene

Graphene 3D Lab

Calverton, NY

Graphene in various forms

Graphene Frontiers

Philadelphia, PA

Graphene for biosensors and medical devices

Graphene Industries

Manchester, U.K.

Graphene on silicon dioxide

Graphene Nanochem

Camberley, U.K.

Graphene in various forms

Graphene Square

Seoul, South Korea

Roll-to-roll CVD graphene

Graphenea

San Sebastian, Spain

Graphene films and graphene oxide powder

Graphensic

Linkӧping, Sweden

Epitaxial graphene on silicon carbide

Grupo Antolin

Burgo, Spain

Graphene oxide

Hangzhou Gelanfeng Nanotechnology

Zhejiang, China

Graphene in various forms

Nanjing XFnano

Nanjing City, China

Graphene in various forms

Nanoinnova Technologies

Madrid, Spain

Graphene in various forms

Nanointegris Technologies

Menlo Park, CA

Graphene nanoplatelets

Nanotech Biomachines

Berkeley, CA

Graphene for biodetection

Perpetuus Advanced Materials

Ammanford, U.K.

Functionalized graphene

Shanghai Simatt Energy Technology

Shanghai, China

Graphene in various forms

Stanford Advanced Materials

Irvine, CA

Graphene and graphene oxide nanopowder, CVD graphene

Suzhou Graphene Nanotechnology

Suzhou, China

Graphene in various forms

Vorbeck

Jessup, MD

Graphene inks for wearable devices

XG Sciences

Lansing, MI

Graphene nanoplatelests, dispersions, and inks

Xolve

Middleton, WI

Graphene dispersions

Yantai Sinagraphene

Yantai City, China

Graphene nanoplatelets

Zhongtuo Materials Technology

Beijing, China

Graphene in various forms

 

Source: AMG NewTech

 

 

Related topics: Synthesis of graphene, biosensors for foodborne pathogens, graphene quantum dots for chemo-photothermal cancer therapy, graphene-based flexible and stretchable bioelectronics, graphene scaffolds for the nervous system, graphene-based super-resolution imaging

Healthcare and Biomedical Engineering


The market for 3D bioprinting is estimated to expand at a CAGR of 59.5% through 2021.

 

Since the start of the new millennium, the three-dimensional (3D) printing market has grown at an exceptional rate worldwide. Surging to a CAGR greater than 15% since 2000, 3D printing has become a very popular technique for rapid prototyping and new product development, reaching global revenues of nearly $5 billion in 2015. Applications target various industry sectors including aerospace, automotive, education, architecture, consumer products and arts and crafts.

 

3D printing is also gaining increasing interest in the biomedical sector for the fabrication of devices such as hearing aids, dental implants, and artificial prostheses. An emerging field for 3D printing within the healthcare sector is bioprinting. The term bioprinting refers in particular to the use of additive manufacturing in the form of digital printing to create living tissues.

 

Bioprinting technologies that have been developed to date are summarized in the table below.

  


3D Bioprinting technologies.

 

Technology

Brief description

Syringe extrusion

Cells, scaffold material and other biological entities are ejected through a small orifice using a piston, a screw or pneumatic pressure.

Laser-guided direct writing

A laser beam guides the cells dispersed in a medium through an orifice and deposits them onto a substrate according to a specific pattern.

Laser induced forward transfer

A laser pulse hits an absorption layer and transfers drops of a cell suspension onto a substrate.

Inkjet printing

Utilizes either a thermal or a piezoelectric actuator to create localized pressure in the bioink causing it to be ejected through a nozzle.

Magnetic levitation

Cells contained in a solution are magnetized and attracted to a magnet placed above the solution. The levitated cells assemble forming specific tissues.

Magnetic printing

Cells contained in a solution are magnetized and printed on the bottom of a holding dish in the form of spheroids, aided by a magnet placed underneath the dish.  

Acoustic cell encapsulation

Utilizes a piezoelectric sensor to transform a cell suspension into hydrogel droplets that encapsulate the cells. The droplets are ejected from the printer and deposited on the substrate.

Valve-based printing

Similar in concept to acoustic cell encapsulation, but using a special valve to form and eject the hydrogel droplets that encapsulate the cells.

Electrohydrodynamic jetting

Similar to syringe-based extrusion, but uses an applied voltage between the orifice and the substrate to control the speed of the ejected bioink.

Hybrid printing

Combines the electrospinning of polymer fibers with inkjet printing of cells to create 3D structures with specific properties.

     

Source: AMG NewTech

 

Many of these techniques are used to produce 3D structures using layer-by-layer deposition. Currently, the most common bioprinting method is syringe extrusion, in which the fluids to be printed are ejected with a low shear force onto the substrate. The substrate usually consists of a bio-inert hydrogel.

 

Syringe extrusion is typically performed according to two processes. The first process is a double printing method in which living cells in the form of cellular spheroids are printed by alternating spheroids and a supporting film. The supporting film functions to keep the cells in place during construction of the 3D structure, and is produced from natural and synthetic hydrogels (e.g., alginate, collagen, chitosan, hyaluronic acid, and polyethylene glycol), biocompatible polymers (e.g., polycaprolactone), and ultra-violet cross-linkable polymers (Irgacure).

 

The second extrusion process is single-step and consists of using a bioink containing both the cells and the fluid that holds the cells in place. In addition to cells and supporting fluid, other biocompatible and biological entities having different functions can be added to the bioink such as bioactive components, morphogens, organoids, and growth factors. To deposit cells, supporting fluid, and other components, printing systems with either single or multi-nozzle configurations can be adopted.  

 

At the present time, the remaining bioprinting methods are not very popular due to various drawbacks.  Inkjet printing, for example, tends to damage the cells and the printhead becomes easily clogged, while laser-guided direct writing is characterized by low throughput. However, numerous R&D activities are in progress to improve the performance of existing bioprinting techniques.

 

The ultimate goal of 3D bioprinting is to eventually reproduce human organs. This goal is naturally expected to raise many ethical issues. In the meantime, bioprinting is gaining traction for tissue engineering research, drug development, and toxicology studies. 

 

A summary of current and emerging applications for bioprinting is provided in the table below. 



Current and emerging applications of 3D bioprinting.


Applications

Tissue engineering

Drug development

Toxicology studies

Evaluation of cancer cell migration

In-vitro assays for clinical diagnostics

Skin regeneration

Wound treatment

Facial reconstruction

Cosmetic dentistry

Replacement of damaged or degenerating tissue

Organs-on-a-chip

Production of organs

             

Source: AMG NewTech

  

Scientists have already been able to print several types of tissues, including bone, cartilage, vascular, muscle, liver, and skin. Fillers are placed in the 3D structures to form channels or empty spaces similar to those present in natural tissues. These features are needed for the delivery of nutrients and oxygen to maintain living tissue. Tissue engineering research is focusing on both implantable tissues and tissue printed on site (e.g., skin tissue printed on a patient with burns).

 

The next table provides a sample of relevant research activities in progress at various leading R&D organizations involved in 3D bioprinting.

  


Leading research organizations involved in 3D bioprinting.

 

Organization

Location

R&D Activities

Cardiovascular Innovation Institute

Louisville, KY

Bioprinting of blood vessels and human heart tissue

Cornell University

Ithaca, NY

Bioprinting of heart valves

Harvard Medical School

Cambridge, MA

Syringe-based extrusion bioprinting coupled with a microfluidic device

Livermore National Laboratory

Livermore, CA

Self-assembly of vascular networks in bioprinted tissues

Sabanci University

Instanbul, Turkey

Scaffold-free aortic tissue

Scripps Clinic

La Jolla, CA

Inkjet printing of cartilage

Tulane University

New Orleans, LA

Bioprinting by laser direct write

University of California at San Diego

San Diego, CA

Bioprinted liver tissue from stem cells

University of Toronto

Toronto, Canada

Microfluidic-assisted bioprinting

University of Wollongong

Fairy Meadow, Australia

Bioprinting of neural tissue

Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine

Winston-Salem, NC

Inkjet bioprinting of skin

            

Source: AMG NewTech

  

In 2016, bioprinting is estimated to represent less than 3% of the global biomedical 3D printing market. Expected to exit the development stage, bioprinting is forecast to generate global revenues of $248 million in 2021, corresponding to a CAGR of 59.5% during the next five years.  Sales figures include materials (e.g., biocompatible constituents and bioinks), equipment (e.g., inkjet printers), and products (e.g., implantable components and tissues).  In 2021, bioprinting is projected to account for 12.5% of the nearly $2 billion biomedical 3D printing market. Bone and cartilage tissues for implants and skin tissues for cosmetics, wound treatment, and facial regeneration are projected to account for a combined 73% of the total market.

 

 

The next table provides a list of key players in the 3D bioprinting industry. They are producers of bioinks, bioprinted tissues and/or bioprinting equipment. 

  


Key players in 3D bioprinting.

 

Company

Location

Product Type

3D Bioprinting Solutions

Moscow, Russia

Syringe-based extrusion bioprinter

3Dynamic Systems

Swansea, U.K.

Syringe-based extrusion bioprinter

Advanced Solutions Life Sciences

Louisville, KY

Syringe-based extrusion bioprinter

Aether

San Francisco, CA

Syringe-based extrusion bioprinter

Aspect Biosystems

Vancouver, Canada

Syringe-based extrusion bioprinter with microfluidic channels

Bio3D Technologies

Singapore

Syringe-based extrusion bioprinter

BioBots

Philadelphia, PA

Syringe-based extrusion bioprinter

Cellink

Palo Alto, CA

Syringe-based extrusion bioprinter

Cyfuse Biomedical

Tokyo, Japan

Syringe-based extrusion with needle arrays

Digilab

Marlborough, MA

Inkjet bioprinter

EnvisionTec

Gladbeck, Germany

Syringe-based extrusion bioprinter

GeSiM

Radeberg, Germany

Syringe-based extrusion bioprinter

MicroFab Technologies

Plano, TX

Inkjet bioprinter

Microjet

Shiojiri-shi, Japan

Inkjet bioprinter

n3D Biosciences

Houston, TX

Magnetic levitation and magnetic printing

nScript

Orlando, FL

Syringe-based extrusion bioprinter

Organovo

San Diego, CA

Tissues bioprinted by syringe-based extrusion

Ourobotics

Cork, Ireland

Syringe-based extrusion bioprinter

Poietis

Pessac, France

Laser assisted bioprinting

Qingdao Unique Products

Qingdao City, China

Syringe-based extrusion bioprinter

Regemat 3D

Granada, Spain

Syringe-based extrusion bioprinter

RegenHU

Villaz-St-Pierre, Switzerland

Syringe-based extrusion bioprinter

Regenovo

Hangzhou, China

Syringe-based extrusion bioprinter and bioprinted tissues

Rokit

Seoul, South Korea

Syringe-based extrusion bioprinter

SE3D Education

Redwood City, CA

Syringe-based extrusion bioprinter for educational purpose

Sichuan Revotek

Chengdu, China

Syringe-based extrusion bioprinter and bioprinted tissues

TeVido BioDevices

Austin, TX

Inkjet bioprinted tissues

 

Source: AMG NewTech

 

 

Related topic: cartilage bioprinting for personalized medicine, nanocellulose-based bioink for cartilage bioprinting, mechanically strong structures for bone repair,  bioprinting of differentiated epidermal tissues manufacturing readiness of bioprinting, the biopen as a handheld syringe-based extrusion bioprinter

 

 

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Healthcare and Biomedical Engineering


The market for microfluidic devices for neurology is forecast to grow at a CAGR of 20.1% through 2021.

 

The human nervous system consists of the central nervous system (CNS), which includes the brain and spinal cord, and the peripheral nervous system (PNS), which includes nerves and ganglia. The basic cell unit for the tissues forming the human nervous system is the neuron. There is growing interest in the development of technologies for the regeneration and repair of nervous tissue.

 

One of the most advanced technologies in this field is microfluidics. In neurology, microfluidics is applied either in vitro or in vivo to grow and isolate cells, probe functional properties of neurons, deliver treatments to diseased tissues, and regenerate the affected tissue.

 

A detailed summary of current and emerging applications of microfluidics in neurology is provided in the table below.  

  


Applications of microfluidics in neurology.

 

Segment

Applications

In Vivo

Controlled delivery of drugs

Targeting of drugs to specific cells of the brain

Evaluation of response of CNS to auditory stimulus

In Vitro

Controlled delivery of fluids (e.g., drugs, signals, enzymes, and proteins)

Stimulation and analysis of neurons

Development and growth of axon and other cell components

Separation and isolation of neural cells and stem cells

Generation of functional neurons from stem cells

Creation of biosensors

Modeling of three-dimensional neural circuits

Creation of organs-on-a-chip (i.e., mimicking of organ physiology), in particular brain-on-a-chip

Recording and manipulation of electrical signals produced by neural cells

Ribonucleic acid extraction

Detection of proteins and other biomarkers associated with traumatic brain injuries

Simulation of blood brain barriers

Production of radiotracers for medical imaging of neurological diseases

Fabrication of ordered microstructures for use as tissue engineering scaffolds for neurons

Capture and characterization of circulating brain tumor cells

 

Source: AMG NewTech

 

In its most basic configuration, a microfluidic device (or chip) comprises miniature chambers connected by microchannels in which fluids flow continuously. Discrete amounts of fluids (droplets) can also flow by spreading. The movement of fluids is typically generated by one of three techniques: electrophoresis and dielectrophoresis (for continuous flow), and electrowetting (for discrete flow). The amount of fluid processed is measurable in units ranging from microliters to picoliters.

 

Over time the basic microfluidic technology has evolved to include components such as valves, microchambers and pumps. More complex devices also comprise coils, sensors, microfilters, and lasers, forming fully functional microscopic laboratories, also known as lab-on-a-chip (LOCs) or micro total analysis systems (µ-TAS).

 

Microfluidic devices are fabricated using processes that are common in microelectronics and, in particular, for manufacturing microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). In fact, microfluidic devices, together with microneedles, pressure sensors, and bioactuators, form a category of devices that are referred to as BioMEMS (i.e., biomedical microelectromechanical system).

 

Common materials for producing microfluidic chips are glass, silicon, silica, and polymers. Polymers have become very popular during the last decade due to their higher biocompatibility. Those that are used the most are poly(dimethylsiloxane), also known as PDMS, polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), cyclic olefin polymers and copolymers, and polycarbonate.

 

The market for microfluidic devices for neurological applications is estimated to be valued at approximately $30 million in 2015 but it is forecast to expand at a very healthy CAGR of 20.1% through 2020.

The next table provides a list of key producers of microfluidic devices for the medical sector with special focus on neurological applications. 

 


Key producers of microfluidic devices for neurological applications.

 

Company

Location

Product Type

Acamp

Edmonton, Canada

Microfluidic chips

Aixtek

Boston, MA

Microfluidic chips

ALine

Rancho Dominguez, CA

Microfluidic chips

Axxicon

Son, the Netherlands

Microfluidic chips

BioTray

Villeurbanne, France

Microfluidic chips

Creative MicroSystems

Waitsfield, VT

Microfluidic chips based on glass, silicon, silica, and polymers

Cytocentrics

Eindhoven, the Netherlands

Microfluidic chips and BioMEMS

Design 1 Solutions

Allen, TX

Microfluidic chips based on glass, silicon, plastic, PDMS, rubber, and metals

Epigem

Redcar, United Kingdom

Polymeric microfluidic chips

FlowJem

Toronto, Canada

Polymeric microfluidic chips

Fluidware Technologies

Kasukabehigashi, Japan

PDMS microfluidic chips

Gesim

Radeberg, Germany

Microfluidic chips based on silicon, glass, polymers, and PDMS

Invenios

Santa Barbara, CA

Microfluidic chips

iX-factory

Dortmund, Germany

Glass and silicon microfluidic chips

LioniX

Enschede, the Netherlands

Microfluidic chips

Little Things Factory

Elsoff, Germany

Glass, quartz, glass-silicon microfluidic chips

Micralyne

Edmonton, Canada

Glass, silica, quartz and silicon microfluidic chips

Microchips Biotech

Lexington, MA

Microfluidic chips

Microlab Devices

Leeds, United Kingdom

Microfluidic chips

Microliquid

Arrasate-Mondragon, Spain

Glass, silicon and polymeric microfluidic chips and microprobes

Micronit Microfluidics

Enschede, the Netherlands

Polymer, glass and silicon microfluidic chips

Millipore

Billerica, MA

Microfluidic plates

MiniFab

Melbourne, Australia

Polymeric microfluidic chips

Rogue Valley Microdevices

Medford, OR

BioMEMS

Sylex Microsystems

Järfälla, Sweden

Microfluidic chips and BioMEMS

SIMTech Microfluidics

Singapore

Polymeric microfluidic chips

Stanford Microfluidics Foundry

Stanford, CA

Microfluidic chips

ThinXXS Microtechnology

Zweibrücken, Germany

Polymeric microfluidic chips

Translume

Ann Arbor, MI

Glass microfluidic chips

Tronics Microsystems

Crolles, France

Microfluidic chips and BioMEMS

uFluidics

Toronto, Canada

Microfluidic chips

Xona Microfluidics

Temecula, CA

PDMS microfluidic chips   

 

Source: AMG NewTech 

 


Related topics: microfluidic chips for nerve injury, nervous system lab-on-chip, microfluidics for neurology, microfluidics for neurological diseases, BioMEMS for neurologysuperalloys for microfluidic devices, medical electronics market

 

 

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Nanotechnology


The market for nanotextiles is forecast to grow at a CAGR of 22.3% through 2020.

 

The term nanotextiles is used to define fabrics that are manufactured based on nanotechnology.  There are several processes that are employed to produce nanotextiles, the most common of which are the following: 

  

 

  • Incorporating nanostructures within the fibers that form the fabric. Examples of suitable nanostructures are nanoparticles, nanochips, nanotubes, nanorods, nanofibers and nanocapsules.
  • Coating the fibers or the fabric with colloidal solutions containing nanostructures (this process is also known as nanocoating).
  • Directly utilizing nanofibers to manufacture fabrics.
  • Introducing nanoporosity in the manufacture of fabrics.

 

 

 

Nanotextiles are made primarily from natural and synthetic fibers and include woven and nonwoven textiles.  Products based on inorganic fibers (e.g., ceramic and metallic fibers) are typically not included in the definition of nanotextiles. As indicated in the table below, nanotextiles find application in various industry sectors ranging from apparel/home furnishing to space exploration.

 

 

 

Applications of nanotextiles.

 

Sector

Applications

Apparel/ Home furnishing

Hydrophobic and oleophobic fabrics that are water-, stain- and dust-repellent

Water-repellent swimsuits

Anti-wrinkle fabrics

Insect-repellent textiles

Flame-retardant textiles

Clothing that self-adjust body temperature to weather

Fabrics for ultraviolet radiation protection

Heat-insulating textiles

Moisture-absorbent fabrics

Clothing with integrated sensors

Textiles with built-in optic effects

Smart textiles

Chemical/

Environmental

Catalyst for hydrogen peroxide electroreduction

Air and water filtration devices

Construction

Protective layers for buildings

Defense

Bullet-proof vests

Heat-insulating uniforms

Energy

Energy harvesting devices for transforming mechanical energy from human motion into electrical energy to power electronic devices

Electrodes and separators for lithium-ion batteries, supercapacitors and fuel cells

Life sciences

Antibacterial and antiviral products

Wound dressings with antimicrobial properties

Tissue engineering scaffolds

Artificial skin

Space exploration

Thermally conductive fabrics for space suits

     

Source: AMG NewTech

 

The next table provides a representative list of key players in the nanotextile industry.

 


Key players in the nanotextile industry.

 

Company

Location

Products

Clarcor

Franklin, TN

Filtration media

Clearbridge Nanomedics

Singapore

Nanotextiles for life science applications

Cummins Filtration

Nashville, TN

Filtration products

Dogi International Fabrics

Barcelona, Spain

Functional fabrics containing nanoparticles

Donaldson

Minneapolis, MN

Filtration products

DreamWeaver

Greenville, SC

Battery separators

DryWired

Los Angeles, CA

Hydrophobic/ self-cleaning nanocoatings for textiles

DuPont

Wilmington, DE

Filtration products and components for batteries

Econano

Barcelona, Spain

Stain-resistant and antibacterial nanocoatings for textiles

Esfil Teho

Sillamäe, Estonia

Filtration products

E-Spin Technologies

Chattanooga, TN

Filtration media, tissue engineering scaffolds, and high-performance fabrics

Fibertex Nonwovens

Aalborg, Denmark

Filtration media

Finetex EnE

Seoul, South Korea

Filtration media, high-performance fabrics, and construction products

Freudenberg Filtration Technologies

Weinheim, Germany

Filtration products

Hirose Paper Manufacturing

Kochi, Japan

Nanofiber overlaid nonwoven for various applications

Hollingsworth & Vose Company

East Walpole, MA

Filtration media

Irema-Filter

Postbauer-Pavelsback, Germany

Filtration media

Japan Vilene

Tokyo, Japan

Nanofiber-based nonwoven for membranes

Mann+Hummel

 

Ludwigsburg, Germany

Filtration media

Milliken

Spartansburg, SC

Filtration media and battery separators

Nanex

Maldegem, Belgium

Nanocoatings for textiles

Nanofiber Solutions

Columbus, OH

Tissue engineering scaffolds

NanoTech

Taipei, Taiwan

Hydrophobic nanocoatings for textiles

 

Nanotex

Bloomfield Hills, MI

Nanotechnology-based textile enhancement products

Nano-Textile

Nahariya, Israel

Antibacterial fabrics

Nanovia

Litvinov-Chuderin, Czech Republic

Antimicrobial, antiallergy and waterproof nanotextiles

Nicast

Lod, Israel

Wound dressings

Pardam

Pardubice, Czech Republic

Filtration media

Revolution Fibres

Auckland, New Zealand

Nanofiber-based nonwoven for various applications

Rust-Oleum NeverWet

Vernon Hills, IL

Superhydrophobic nanocoatings for textiles

Schoeller Technologies

Sevelen, Switzerland

Fabrics based on nanomaterials

Smith & Nephew

London, U.K.

Wound dressings

SNS Nano Fiber Technology

Hudson, OH

Nanofiber-based nonwoven for various applications

Teijin

Osaka, Japan

Nanotextiles for clothing

Toray

Tokyo, Japan

Nanofiber-based nonwoven for various applications

Wolf’s Chemicals

Budapest, Hungary

Dirt-repellent nanocoatings for textiles

Woree Nanophil

Ansan-si, South Korea

Nanofiber-based nonwoven for various applications

 

Source: AMG NewTech

 

The global market for nanotextiles is estimated to have reached global revenues of $2.5 billion in 2015 and is forecast to grow at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 22.3% through 2020. The largest segment of the market is represented by nanocoated fabrics. 

 

 

Back to Main Topics

 

 

Keywords: nano textile, nano-textile, nanofabric, nano fabric, nano-fabric, technical textile, advanced textile, market 

Mechanical, Chemical and Environmental Technologies


The market for superalloys and shape memory alloys for medical applications is forecast to grow at a CAGR of 10.6% through 2020.

 

Superalloys are a group of high-performance alloys that are resistant to creep, corrosion and high temperatures (above 540ºC). There are three main classes of super alloys: nickel-, nickel/iron-, and cobalt-based. Other elements forming superalloys include chromium, tungsten, molybdenum, tantalum, niobium, titanium, and aluminum. Their unique properties are related to the presence of an austenitic face-centered cubic structure reinforced by a secondary phase (called gamma prime).

 

Currently, the main application of superalloys is for the fabrication of aircraft engines and power generation turbines. Superalloys are also used in the healthcare sector, where they are valued for their anticorrosion properties, mechanical strength, low weight, and good biocompatibility and inertness. As displayed in the table below, common uses are for the fabrication of medical devices and implants (e.g. stents, catheters, and prostheses), surgical instruments, drugs and drug delivery devices, biosensors and microfluidic devices, diagnostic equipment, and dental restorations.

 

Superalloys for healthcare applications are primarily based on nickel-chromium, nickel-aluminum, and cobalt-chromium. Nickel-titanium (NiTi, or Nitinol) is also often included in the category of superalloys. Nitinol is a unique material that exhibits an austenitic face-centered cubic structure at high temperatures and a martensitic crystal structure at low temperatures. It is characterized by shape memory andsuperelasticity, which allow this material to return to its original shape upon heating. These properties have made NiTi popular for orthodontic wires and stents. Recently, a nickel-titanium-copper shape-memory alloy has been developed that is capable of being bent over 10 million times without exhibiting wear.

 

The market for superalloys and shape memory alloys for medical applications is estimated to reach global revenues of $1.9 billion in 2015 and forecast to grow at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 10.6% through 2020. 

 

 


Superalloys and shape memory alloys, and their applications in healthcare.

 

Materials

Applications

Nickel-chromium (Inconel);

nickel-chromium-molybdenum;

nickel-chromium-molybdenum-titanium;

nickel-chromium-cobalt-iron;

nickel-chromium-cobalt-molybdenum;

nickel-aluminum-tantalum-titanium;

nickel-aluminum-molybdenum;

nickel-titanium (Nitinol);

nickel-titanium-tantalum;

nickel-titanium-chromium;

nickel-titanium-aluminum

cobalt-chromium;

cobalt-chromium-molybdenum.

 

Stents

Catheters

Pacing leads

Guidewires

Orthopaedic cables

Blood-contacting devices

Prosthesis (e.g., modular artificial joints)

Spine component

Implantable microsystems for diagnostics

Birth control devices

Surgical instruments

Components of drug delivery devices

Nanoparticles for antibacterial and antiviral preparations

Microfluidic devices

Biosensors

Plasma panel apparatus for X-ray equipment

Dental instruments

Dental restorations

 

 

  Source: AMG NewTech

 

The table below provides a representative list of manufacturers of superalloy and shape memory alloy products for the healthcare industry.

 

 


Manufacturers of superalloy and shape memory alloy products for the healthcare industry.

 

Company

Location

Product Type

Allegheny Technologies 

Pittsburgh, PA

Shape memory alloys and superalloys

AMF

Lury-sur-Arnon, France

Shape memory alloys

Burpee Materials Technology

Eatontown, NJ

Shape memory alloys

 

Carpenter

Wyomissing, PA

Superalloys

Dynalloy

Irvine, CA

Shape memory alloys

Endosmart

Stutensee, Germany

Shape memory alloys

Euroflex

Pforzheim, Germany

Shape memory alloys and superalloys

Fort Wayne Metals

Fort Wayne, IN

Shape memory alloys and superalloys

Hamilton Precision Metals

Lancaster, PA

Superalloys

Intrinsic Devices

San Francisco, CA

Shape memory alloys

Johnson Matthey Medical

West Chester, PA

Shape memory alloys

Metalwerks

Aliquippa, PA

Shape memory alloys and superalloys

MicroGroup

Medway, MA

Shape memory alloys

 

Nippon Steel & Sumitomo Metal

Tokyo, Japan

Shape memory alloys

 

Nitinol Devices & Components

Freemont, CA

Shape memory alloys

 

SAES Getters

Lainate, Milan

Shape memory alloys

Special Metals

New Hartford, NY

Shape memory alloys

 

Ulrich

North Haven, CT

Shape memory alloys and superalloys

Ultimate Wireforms

Bristol, CT

Shape memory alloys

 

 

Source: AMG NewTech

 

 

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Keywords: superalloy, super alloy, shape memory alloys, advanced alloys, high performance alloys, medical, healthcare, market 

Healthcare and Biomedical Engineering


The market for tissue engineering scaffolds is forecast to grow at a CAGR of 17.2% through 2020.

 

A tissue engineering scaffold is a porous three-dimensional (3D) matrix that is seeded with cells and/or bioactive factors leading to growth of new tissue either in-vitro or in-vivo.  The new tissue is used to repair, replace and regenerate tissue damaged by disease, injury or congenital defect. Tissue engineering scaffolds act as a support for cells and guide their migration, adhesion, reproduction and differentiation, and also affect new tissue vascularization and the delivery of nutrients needed for cell proliferation and differentiation.

 

As shown in the table below, various materials, including polymers, glass, ceramics, and metals, have been introduced to manufacture tissue engineering scaffolds for hard (e.g., bone and cartilage) and soft tissues (e.g., skin, muscle and nerve).

 

R&D activities are not only focusing on material formulation but also on fabrication methods that are capable of producing scaffolds with the following characteristics: high porosity and pore interconnectivity, controlled pore size, biodegradability, biocompatibility, adequate cell adhesion and surface roughness, appropriate chemical and topographical surface properties, and good mechanical strength.

 

Processes commonly used to manufacture tissue engineering scaffolds include polymer foam replication, gas foaming, sol-gel casting, electrospinning, thermally induced phase separation (TIPS) and freeze drying. Fabrication technologies based on additive processes (e.g., 3-D printing, stereolithography, selective laser sintering, melt-extrusion, solution/slurry extrusion, and tissue/organ printing) have been attracting greater interest based on their ability to rapidly produce complex geometries. Among these technologies, 3-D printing is particularly promising due to its versatility in permitting computer-controlled construction of pores, surface roughness, and textured surfaces, all of which facilitate the growth of specific tissues

 

Tissue engineering scaffolds are emerging as a promising method to repair, augment and regenerate organ functionality. These scaffolds allow for the growth of new tissue from the patient’s own cells and therefore avoid problems related to adverse immune response, pathogen transmission and donor site morbidity. The market for tissue engineering scaffolds is estimated to be valued at $720 million in 2015 and is projected to grow at a CAGR of 17.2% during the next five years. Bone repair currently accounts for approximately 65% of the market.

 

 


Traditional and emerging materials for tissue engineering scaffolds.

 

Type

Material

Synthetic polymers

Poly (ethylene glycol)

Poly (propylene fumarate)

Poly beta-hydroxy-butyrate

Poly lactic-co-glycolic acid

Poly lactic-co-glycolic acid/ polyethylene glycol

Poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate)

Poly(glycerol sebacic acid)

Poly(vinylidene fluoride)

Polyamide 6

Polyanhydride

Polycaprolactone

Polyethylene oxide/polysiloxane

Polyglycolic acid

Polylactic acid

Polylactic acid/polyethylene glycol

Polylactide-co-polycaprolactone

Poly-l-lactide acid

Polyphosphazene

Polypyrrole

Polyurethane

Sulfated polysaccharide/ polycaprolactone

Sulfated polysaccharide/ polyethylene oxide

Xanthan gum

Natural polymers

Agarose

Alginate

Cellulose

Chitosan

Collagen

Fibrin

Fibrinogen

Fibronectic

Hyaluronic acid          

Poly(hydroxybutyrate)

Starch

Ceramics

Natural and synthetic hydroxyapatite

Hydroxyapatite coated with bioactive glass-ceramic

Hydroxyapatite functionalized with amino acids

Biphasic calcium phosphate

Beta-Tricalcium phosphate

Nanostructured calcium phosphate

Glass

Silicate, borate and phosphate bioactive glass

Metals

Titanium and its alloys

Tantalum

Magnesium

Iron

Composites

Poly(glycerol sebacate)/cellulose nanocrystals

Polyvinyl alcohol/hyaluronic acid

Hydroxyapatite/poly-l-lactic acid/proteins

Hydroxyapatite/gelatin

Polycaprolactone/hydroxyapatite/nanoclay

Polycaprolactone/silk fibroin

Polycaprolactone/starch

Polyurethane/strontium-substituted hydroxyapatite

Collagen/proteins

Hydroxyapatite/collagen

Gelatine/polyacrylic acid

Hyaluronic acid/ sodium alginate

 

 Source: AMG NewTech

 

 

A representative list of relevant industry players involved in manufacturing and/or development of tissue engineering scaffolds is provided below.

 

 


Relevant players in the tissue engineering scaffold industry.

 

Company

Location

Scaffold Materials

3D Biotek

Hillsborough, NJ

Biodegradable and non-biodegradable polymers

3-D Matrix

Waltham, MA

Resorbable hydrogel with amino acid groups

Admedus

Minneapolis, MN

Collagen

Atex Technologies

Pinebluff, NC

Various resorbable and nonresorbable polymers

Bio Scaffold International

Singapore

Biocompatible polymers

Biomedical Structures

Warwick, RI

Various polymers

Esi-Bio

Alameda, CA

Hyaluronan

Fujifilm

Tokyo, Japan

Recombinant peptide

Heppe Medical Chitosan

Halle, Germany

Chitosan

InoCure

Praha, Czech Republic

Polycaprolactone

InVivo Therapeutics

Cambridge, MA

Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)/ Poly-L-Lysine

ISurTec

St. Paul, MN

Collagen, biodegradable polymers

Luna

Roanoke, VA

Bioactive hydrogel

Matricore

Geleen, the Netherlands

Composite

 

Neotherix

York, United Kingdom

Polyglycolide

OsteoNexus

Kaufman, TX

Polycaprolactone

Osteopore

Kaufman, TX

Polycaprolactone

Reinnervate

Durham, United Kingdom

Polystyrene

 

Secant Medical

Telford, PA

Poly(glycerol sebacate)

Sigma Aldrich

St. Louis, MO

Peptide

 

Source: AMG NewTech

 

 

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Keywords: tissue engineering, scaffold, hard tissue, soft tissue, bone repair, materials, market 

Advanced Materials


The market for thermoelectric materials is forecast to grow at a CAGR of 27.3% through 2020.

 

Although the thermoelectric effect was discovered almost 200 years ago, thermoelectric materials have been experiencing strong renewed interest in recent years thanks to the development of advanced materials with increased thermoelectric efficiency and lower production costs.

 

Thermoelectric materials, which can be used for direct conversion of heat into electrical energy, or viceversa, are particularly appealing for energy harvesting applications. For example, these materials can be used to obtain power from the heat generated by combustion engines, manufacturing processes and equipment, or the human body.

 

A material’s thermoelectric efficiency is measured by the dimensionless factor (thermoelectric figure of merit) ZT = S2/k)T, where σ, S, k, and T are the electrical conductivity, the Seebeck coefficient (or thermoelectric power), the thermal conductivity, and the operating temperature, respectively. As a reference, bismuth telluride, a well-known thermoelectric material, has a ZT value of 1.0 at room temperature. However, bismuth telluride (Bi2Te3) has not gained widespread popularity primarily due to its high production cost.

 

To exhibit high thermoelectric efficiency, a material must be characterized by both high electrical conductivity and low thermal conductivity. Typically, those materials that have good electrical conductivity are also good thermal conductors. Advances in material science during the past ten years have led to the development of various formulations with relatively high ZT values. They are summarized in the table below.

 

At the indicated temperature, the ZT value for that particular material reaches the reported peak value. Materials with ZT values equal to or greater than 1 are attracting particular interest; although, in an effort to make thermoelectricity more competitive with alternative technologies, the objective of current research is to obtain ZT values closer to 3.

 

In April 2014, Nature reported that scientists at Northwestern University (Evanston, IL) and the University of Michigan (Ann Arbor, MI) discovered a ZT value of 2.6 at 923 K in SnSe single crystals along the b axis of the room-temperature orthorhombic unit cell.

 


 

 Thermoelectric materials with high ZT values.

 

Material

Peak

 ZT value

Temperature (K)

p-Type

 

 

Sb2Te3

1.0

300

Bis-dithienothiophene

1.5

300

AgPbSnSbTe

1.5

630

NaPbSbTe

1.7

650

PbTe

1.0

700

PbSe

1.0

700

Ni-doped tetrahedrite (CuSbS)

1.0

          700

TeAgGeSb (TAGS)

1.2

          700

Tl-doped SnTe

1.3

          700

Zn4Sb3

1.4

          700

Tl-doped PbTe

1.5

          700

Sb2Te3 –based alloys

1.7

700

Na-doped PbTe

1.4

750

K-doped PbTeSe

1.6

775

NaCo2O4 (single crystals)

  1.2

 800

SrTe-doped PbTe

1.7

800

PbS/Na-doped PbTe

1.8

800

PbS-doped PbSe

1.3

900

SrTe/Na-doped PbTe

2.2

900

Barium-doped BiCuSeO

  1.1

  920

Metal sulfide-doped PbS

  1.2

  920

SnSe single crystals

  2.6

  920

Nanostructured Cu2Se

  2.0

  975

MnSb-based alloys

1.1

        1,200

 

 

 

n-Type

 

 

Bi2Te3

1.0

300

Bi2Te3 nanocomposites

1.5

375

CuBiTeSe

1.1

          400

AgSbTe2/PbTe

1.7

          700

Mg2(Si,Sn)

1.3

          700

Ge/Bi-doped Mg2(Si,Sn)

 1.4

  800

Sr/Ba/Yb-doped skutterudites

1.9

 835

Nanostructured P-doped SiGe

1.5

 900

SiGe nanowires

1.6

        1,200

 

 

    Source: AMG NewTech



The global market for thermoelectric materials is currently very small and estimated to reach $3 million in 2015, but it is forecast to grow at a rapid CAGR of 27.3% during the next five years.

 

 

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Keywords: thermoelectric, heat to electricity, conversion, materials, market 

Advanced Materials


The market for flat glass used for radiation shielding is forecast to grow at a CAGR of 13.6% through 2020.

 

The global primary flat glass market is estimated to reach $49.8 billion in 2015, and grow at a CAGR of 5.9% during the next five years. Flat glass includes three main categories based on manufacturing process: float, sheet, and rolled.

 

The main applications for flat glass are within the following industry segments: construction (windows, facades and doors), transportation (windshields and windows for vehicles), electronics (primarily displays for computers and portable devices), and energy (thermal panels and solar cells).

 

Other applications include household goods (furniture, appliances, and decorative panels, such as picture framing), vision devices (eyewear and night vision systems) and specialty glass.

 

There are several types of flat glass that are projected to grow at a CAGR greater than 5.9%, including  security and safety glass, solar control glass, self-cleaning glass, smart glass, and glass for heads-up display windshields, which are estimated to have a CAGR between 7% and 10% during the next five years.

 

Another relevant type is radiation shielding glass (RSG). It is primarily used to protect from X-rays and gamma-rays in laboratories, hospitals, medical and dental offices, nuclear plants, radioactive storage stations, and airport security settings. RSG is typically characterized by a higher lead content and glass thickness compared to other types of flat glass, although, in recent years, many R&D activities have been aiming at the development of lead-free RSG

 

The global market for radiation shielding glass currently represents a very small share of the total flat glass market. It is estimated to reach $110 million in 2015 but is forecast to grow at a robust CAGR of 13.6% through 2020, representing one the fastest growing segments within the flat glass industry.

 

 


Global Market for flat glass by sector, 2015 through 2020. 


Market Segment

Revenues ($ Billions)

CAGR%

2015-2020

2015

2020

Construction

 23.1

28.8

4.5

Transportation

 13.7

18.6

6.3

Electronics

   7.6

 11.5

8.7

Energy

   3.6

   5.2

7.8

Others

   1.8

    2.1

3.1

Total

49.8

  66.2

5.9


Source: AMG NewTech

 

 

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Keywords: flat glass, radiation, shielding, glass, market 

Healthcare and Biomedical Engineering


The market for tissue repair and engineering procedures for cancer treatment is forecast to grow at a 16.1% CAGR through 2020

 

Tissue repair and engineering procedures for cancer treatment (TREPCs) are based on the use of implantable and transplantable materials made from body tissues and biomaterials and are used for restoring, replacing or regenerating tissues affected by cancer. Chemotherapeutic products are not included in this definition.

 

Existing and emerging TREPCs focus on cancer treatment for all body organ systems, including the urinary, reproductive, gastrointestinal, respiratory, cardiac, hematic, skeletal and cranium-maxillofacial, ophthalmic, neurological, muscle, and dermal systems. 

 

In general, materials for tissue repair and engineering are categorized as autografts (obtained from the same patient), allografts (obtained from another individual), xenografts (obtained from an animal), and synthetic materials (partially or completely man-made). TREPCs are primarily based on autologous or allogeneic stem cells and on synthetic materials. Synthetic materials are prepared in the form of microspheres, nanoparticles, nanofibers, pastes, gels, solid components, and injectable solutions and emulsions, and are made from a variety of materials including ceramics, glass, glass-ceramics, polymers, metal and alloys, or composites.

 

TREPC materials of recent development integrate pharmaceutical compounds (i.e., drugs), biological compounds (e.g., DNA, proteins, enzymes, and peptides) and engineered microorganisms (e.g., bacteria) with the function to improve biocompatibility, bioactivity and cell regeneration speed. 

 

Relevant market players in the field of TREPCs are Celgene, Mesoblast, BioTime, Cellerant, Gamida Cell, GlobalStem, NeoStem, and TriStem.

 

As shown in the table below, the global TREPC market, which includes costs for materials and surgical procedures but excludes costs associated with hospitalization stays and medical follow-ups, is estimated to reach $800.9 million in 2015. Stem cells account for the largest share of the market at 93.9% of the total, whereas all the other procedures are currently in the clinical trial stage and represent a much smaller share of the market. 

 

AMG NewTech forecasts that the TREPC market will rise at a CAGR of 16.1% through 2020, driven primarily by the expanded use of stem cell therapies and by increased penetration of innovative nanoparticle-based regenerative products. Examples are biodegradable polymeric nanoparticles that deliver targeted drugs and also act as scaffolds for new cell growth. 



Global market for tissue repair and engineering procedures for cancer treatment by material type, 2015 through 2020.


Material Type

Revenues ($ Millions)

CAGR%

2015-2020

2015

2020

Stem cells

751.8

1,525.3

15.2

Nanoparticles

  44.0

   154.8

28.6

Microspheres

    4.7

       7.0

  9.7

Others

    0.4

       0.7

12.1

Total

800.9

1,687.8

16.1


Source: AMG NewTech

 

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Keywords: tissue, repair, engineering, cancer, treatment, nanoparticles, market 

 

Healthcare and Biomedical Engineering


Healthy market growth in medical electronics through 2016

 

The medical electronics sector is forecast to expand at a healthy 8.4% compound annual growth rate (CAGR) during the period 2011 through 2016. The medical electronics sector can be divided into three key segments: medical devices and implants; patient monitoring, diagnostics, and therapy; and medical imaging and instrumentation.

 

While the largest segment is currently represented by medical devices and implants, the fastest growth is occurring in the patient monitoring, diagnostics, and therapy segment, due to the growing use of remote patient monitoring, wireless technologies for diagnostics and therapy, and telemedicine. As a result, the patient monitoring, diagnostics, and therapy segment is projected to grow at a robust CAGR of 15.7% during the period 2011 through 2016.

 

The use of lasers, within the medical imaging and instrumentation segment, is also expanding at a rapid rate. Within slower growing market segments (medical devices and implants, and medical imaging and instrumentation) there are several emerging applications, such as implantable sensors, which are expected to offer important market growth opportunities over the next five years.

 



Global market for medical electronics, 2011 through 2016. 

 

 

Market Segment

Revenues ($ Billions)

 

 2011

 

 2016

CAGR%

2011-2016

Medical devices and implants

 

 

 

Microelectronic medical implants

    15.0

    23.2

         9.1

Cardiovascular devices

    87.0

  100.0

         2.8

Neurosensons, neuromodulators and neurostimulators

    8.1

 23.6

23.8

                                                                 Subtotal

110.1

146.8

 5.9

Patient monitoring, diagnostics and therapy

 

 

 

Remote patient monitoring

  0.2

    2.1

60.0

Wireless healthcare and services

  7.7

  24.0

25.5

Telemedicine

11.0

  26.6

19.3

Home health monitoring instruments

18.7

  25.5

 6.4

Home telehealth technologies

  0.4

    0.7

11.8

                                                                 Subtotal

38.0

  78.9

15.7

Medical imaging and instrumentation

 

 

 

Diagnostic imaging equipment for oncology

 12.0

  15.5

  5.3

Magnetic resonance imaging

   4.8

    6.6

  6.6

Medical sensors

   8.0

    9.5

  3.5

Medical lasers

   2.6

    5.4

      15.7

                                                                 Subtotal

 27.4

  37.0

        6.2

Others

   2.0

    3.1

        9.2

Global medical electronics

 177.5

   265.8

        8.4


Source: AMG NewTech


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Keywords: medical, electronics, implants, patient, monitoring, diagnostics, therapy, imaging, instrumentation, market